Sunday, June 29, 2008

Jealousy

Jealousy has been on my mind lately. It’s another emotion in the Phantom of the Opera, which I like to call our psychological playground. You may not be struggling with jealousy presently, but as humans, it does occasionally knock on each of our doors wearing different masks. Do you see any jealousy lurking around the Opera House?

Before you cringe thinking I am about to preach, relax. It’s just a quote, however, the Bible can be a hot book. There are quite a few seductive love stories hidden inside. One verse in the book of Song of Solomon has a very poignant statement about jealousy. For those of you who don’t know, that’s the book about love and sex written by the king who had 700 wives and 300 concubines. He must have had some first-hand knowledge on the subject to write the following:


For love is as strong as death,
its jealousy unyielding as the grave.
It burns like blazing fire,
like a mighty flame. (Song of Solomon 8:6)

I like another translation that says, “jealousy is as hard and cruel” as death or the grave.

Jealousy is a strong emotion. It drives men to kill, war, steal, duel, and fight – just to name a few. Jealousy, as I think about it in the context of romantic love, is resentment against a rival for another’s affection. Certainly that was the case between the Phantom and Raoul, for both were in the love with the same woman, both were rivals for her affection, and both possessed qualities the other did not that drew Christine to each of them in different ways.

I have no doubt that Erik felt intense jealousy toward Raoul, his rival, for Christine’s affection. Raoul represented all that Erik did not possess – beauty, wealth, and title. The Phantom could offer none of these things to Christine. Yet oddly enough, the Phantom possessed qualities that Raoul lacked, that being music and passion. As I mentioned in an earlier post, Patrick Wilson stated in an interview that as he watched Emmy Rossum and Gerard Butler play out the scene the Point of No Return, he found it quite difficult to watch. There was a jealousy as Raoul realized the obvious passionate attraction between the two.

Jealousy is a consuming emotion that burns like a mighty flame. Unfortunately, it’s the possessor of jealousy who ends up consumed by the very emotion they embrace. It is unyielding, hard to appease, and cruel as the grave. It’s an emotion that is draining and useless, and it takes a mature individual to realize that it’s one emotion not worth the price tag. Our dear Phantom, however, was consumed by it, ultimately paid the price trying to obtain from a rival that which was not his to have.

I think all of us as humans have been touched with jealousy in one way or the other. Perhaps not the overwhelming jealousy surrounding romantic love, but the subtle jealousy of envy and resentment towards what others possess, whether or not we deem them our rivals. It’s probably best when jealousy comes knocking at your door, take a quick glance, check the price tag, and say you’re not interested. Better to turn away the cruel emotion rather than to embrace it and be consumed.

Sincerely,

6 comments:

Inés said...

Jelousy is something that people (all) have felt and not only in a "romantic way" but I think is as a consequence of our insecurity...

I feel that in the book, Raoul is more jealous than Raoul-film. In the book he doesn´t trust Christine. He feels insecure, he is jealous and he shows it in several occasions. In the book, the Phantom seems to control the situation and he doesn´t need to say "I don´t trust". Even he allows Christine to leave the house. He is not insecure about that.

In the film, the Phantom is more jealous than the Phantom-book character because he feels, from the very beginning, that Christine doesn´t belong to him, he has no control over her. He is insecure, he is jealous.

Another difference I have found between book and film is that I think the Phantom in the book is not in love with Christine at the beginning, I mean he sees her as if she ought to him something ("You must love me..."), but he learns how to love her, he finds how to feel the real love and his redemption (both).

In the film, the way he is listening to Christine while she sings "Think of me", shows love and, using a song, he has to "Learn to be lonely" @;P... In that case, redemption is jointed to that kind of loss.

Greetings from Spain!
Inés @:P

Anonymous said...

To Whom It May Condern,

This comment isn't merely about your most recent post, but the entire blog. I figured you'd be most likely to read this if it was put on the most recent.

First and foremost, I want to congratulate you on a job very well done on the design of the entire site. Love it!

I have to put this frankly--Anything short of it will do yoru work no justice. This is FANTASTIC! I'm a new fan of Phantom, and even newer to the site, and I can absolutly say I love both of them. Your blog is the perfect companion to a night of watching the movie and listening to the soundtrack. I've told all of my Broadway-loving friends about this, and I can't say whether they've showed up yet, but when they do, I know they will love it too.

Keep up the good work!

Your dedicated reader,

Merely A Ballerina

Phantom's Student (My Pen Name) said...

I just want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for your wonderful comment about my blog. It makes it all worthwhile when I hear back from readers about how much it touches them. This story so profoundly touched my heart, that I had to write down my thoughts. I ended up pouring my soul into it, and if it's touched ohers I am eternally grateful. I'm glad you enjoy it.

Thank you,
The Phantom's Student

Sohail Yaba said...

Jealosy is the dragon in paradise; the hell of heaven; and the most bitter of the emotions because associated with the sweetest. ~A.R. Orage


Anger and can no more bear to lose sight of their objects than love. ~George Eliot


[T]he ear of jealousy heareth all things. ~The Bible (Apocrypha), Wisdom of Solomon 1:10


Envy is the most stupid of vices, for there is no single advantage to be gained from it. ~Honore de Balzac

Emily Wilson said...

I just want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for your wonderful comment about my blog. It makes it all worthwhile when I hear back from readers about how much it touches them. This story so profoundly touched my heart, that I had to write down my thoughts. I ended up pouring my soul into it, and if it's touched ohers I am eternally grateful. I'm glad you enjoy it.Jealousy Quotes

Shaikh Reza said...

I feel that in the book, Raoul is more jealous than Raoul-film. In the book he doesn´t trust Christine. He feels insecure, he is jealous and he shows it in several occasions. In the book, the Phantom seems to control the situation and he doesn´t need to say "I don´t trust". Even he allows Christine to leave the house. He is not insecure about that.Jealousy Quotes